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Fentress Blog

 

 

 

Ted Prestogeorge

Ted Prestogeorge is a senior architect with Fentress Incorporated, where he has worked since 2006. His primary interests include the history of architecture, Art Deco design, and watercolor painting.

Recent Posts

In a previous blog, we explained the concept of the Eudaimonia Machine. As described in Cal Newport’s book, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World, Eudaimonia Machine is an architectural concept supporting the notion that form follows function. It’s a solution that gives...

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Ramp or lift? That’s the question an architect or planner must ask when deciding how to make all portions of the courtroom fully accessible to court participants. Motorized lifts are costly but can take up less space than floor ramps, which can obstruct circulation. However, by integrating...

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The use of collegial judges’ chambers is a developing trend in courthouse design. A collegial chambers arrangement is where two or more judges’ chambers suites are grouped together, apart from the courtrooms, instead of the traditional arrangement with a judge’s chambers suite being adjacent to...

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In a recent blog, one of my colleagues wrote about the flow state at work, a state in which you are so focused that your tasks seem almost effortless. If you are trying to achieve this deep state of mind in your workplace, having a quiet retreat is helpful. If you have a private office, that’s...

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There are three separate circulation paths in a well-designed modern courthouse: circulation for judges, the public, and prisoners. Each of these circulation paths cannot cross another. However, like a brain-teaser puzzle where you need to draw a shape without crossing lines, how can you...

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